Why Alone? Sensing Children’s Social   Interactions in the Playground

Why Alone? Sensing Children’s Social Interactions in the Playground

With their increasingly sophisticated sensing capacity, mobile phones have been repeatedly used as pervasive, low-cost sensing devices in everyday life [5, 6]. In our line of work we attempt to employ mobile phones as a platform for sensing primary school students’ social participation in the school community.Over the past decade, schools have increasingly shifted towards inclusive education [10]. Rather than dividing students across regular and special education schools, inclusive education argues for ‘one school for all’. Next to its educational benefits, one of the main arguments for inclusive education is the increased social participation of children with learning and communication disabilities in regular, as opposed to special education schools [3]. However, despite the attention given to inclusive education in recent years, researchers have criticized a lack of empirical evidence on how exclusion is manifested in actual students’ behaviours [14]. Even when studies have tried to capture how exclusion is manifested in students’ social interactions within the class and during play time, their focus was limited to a number of school cases as well as particular dimensions of diversity, thus leading to an uncertainty of how such results may generalize to the larger population and how educational exclusion is manifested at large [7, 9, 15]. Existing methodological tools rely largely on selfreporting, either from teachers or students, and are thus susceptible to a number of biases. For instance, teachers have been found to overestimate the social participation of disadvantaged children [8]. In our line of work we attempt to develop technology that senses children’s social interactions in the playground [see [2, 11, 12] for earlier studies]. More specifically, we have...

PLEXQ: Towards a Playful Experiences Questionnaire

Playfulness is an important, but often neglected, design quality for interactive products. This paper presents a first step towards a validated questionnaire called PLEXQ, which measures 17 different facets of playful user experiences. We describe the development and validation of the questionnaire, from the generation of 231 items, to the current questionnaire consisting of 17 constructs of playfulness, each measured through three items. Using PLEXQ we discuss the nature of playfulness by looking at the role of age, gender, and product type in one’s proclivity to experience playfulness differently. Finally, we reveal a four-factor structure of playfulness and discuss the implications for further theory development.   Boberg, M., Karapanos, E., Holopainen, J., Lucero, A. (2015) PLEXQ: Towards a Playful Experiences Questionnaire, In Proceedings of CHI Play’15.   ...
User Experience Over Time: An Initial Framework

User Experience Over Time: An Initial Framework

A recent trend in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) research addresses human needs that go beyond the instrumental, resulting in an increasing body of knowledge about how users form overall evaluative judgments on the quality of interactive products. An aspect largely neglected so far is that of temporality, i.e. how the quality of users’ experience develops over time. This paper presents an in-depth, five-week ethnographic study that followed 6 individuals during an actual purchase of the Apple iPhone. We found prolonged use to be motivated by different qualities than the ones that provided positive initial experiences. Overall, while early experiences seemed to relate mostly to hedonic aspects of product use, prolonged experiences became increasingly more tied to aspects reflecting how the product becomes meaningful in one’s life. Based on the findings, we promote three directions for CHI practice: designing for meaningful mediation, designing for daily rituals, and designing for the self.   Karapanos, E., Zimmerman, J., Forlizzi, J., & Martens, J. B. (2009). User experience over time: an initial framework. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 729-738). ACM.   Loading......
User Experience Over Time

User Experience Over Time

The way we experience and evaluate interactive products develops over time. An exploratory study aimed at understanding how users form evaluative judgments during the first experiences with a product as well as after four weeks of use. Goodness, an evaluative judgment related to the overall satisfaction with the product, was largely formed on the basis of pragmatic aspects (i.e. utility and usability) during the first experi- ences; after four weeks of use identification (i.e. what the products expresses about its owner) became a dominant aspect of how good a product is. Surprisingly, beauty judgments were largely affected by stimulation (e.g. novelty) during the first experiences. Over time stimulation lost its power to make the product beautiful in the users’ eyes.   Karapanos, E., Hassenzahl, M., and Martens, J.B. (2008) User experience over time. In CHI ’08 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI EA ’08). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 3561-3566.     Loading......